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  • Magnesium may protect against hip fractures

    Drinking water with a relatively high concentration of magnesium protects against hip fractures, according to results of a new study. The researchers studied variations in magnesium and calcium levels in drinking water between different areas, as these are assumed to have a role in the development of bone strength. They wanted to examine whether there was a correlation between magnesium and calcium concentrations in drinking water and the incidence of hip fracture. The study results show that magnesium protects against hip fracture for both men and women. The researchers found no independent protective effect of calcium.

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  • Silk-based surgical implants could offer a better way to repair broken bones

    Using pure silk protein derived from silkworm cocoons, investigators have developed surgical plates and screws that offer improved remodeling following injury and can be absorbed by the body over time. When a person suffers a broken bone, current treatment calls for the surgeon to insert screws and plates to help bond the broken sections and enable the fracture to heal. These "fixation devices" are usually made of metal alloys. But metal devices may have disadvantages: Because they are stiff and unyielding, they can cause stress to underlying bone, among other problems.

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  • Complication rates for nonagenarian patients similar to those of younger patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery

    As more Americans are living well into their 90s, the number of nonagenarian total hip replacement (THR) candidates continues to increase.

    The authors of the study concluded that nonagenarian patients can safely undergo a THR, despite advanced age and a higher prevalence of comorbidities. Overall, the nonagenarian patients experienced a complication rate comparable to those of younger THR patients, and the higher mortality rate is well within expectations for individuals age 90 and older.

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  • Glucosamine fails to prevent deterioration of knee cartilage, decrease pain

    Oral glucosamine supplementation is not associated with a lessening of knee cartilage deterioration among individuals with chronic knee pain, a short-term study found. Findings indicate that glucosamine does not decrease pain or improve knee bone marrow lesions -- more commonly known as bone bruises and thought to be a source of pain in those with osteoarthritis.

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  • More osteoarthritis noted later in life in kids who have ACL reconstruction

    Adolescents who have an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life, researchers have discovered. “Early reconstruction of ACLs is often the trend for young more skeletally mature athletes to restore knee stability and prevent progressive meniscal and/or articular cartilage damage. Often these procedures do allow individuals to return to the playing field and continue an active lifestyle. However, it is still important to evaluate long-term effects such as osteoarthritis when considering surgeries for these pediatric patients,” said the lead researcher.

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  • Women report more pain than men after knee replacement surgery, study shows

    One of the biggest concerns of patients considering knee replacement is the amount of pain they will have after surgery. Although it is a very successful operation overall to relieve arthritis pain and restore function, persistent postoperative pain can be a problem for some individuals. Researchers determined which patients were at highest risk for increased postoperative pain based on demographic and surgical variables.

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  • Chance of falling after knee replacement not increased by regional anesthesia

    Two types of regional anesthesia do not make patients more prone to falls in the first days after having knee replacement surgery as some have previously suggested, according to a study based on nearly 200,000 patient records. Regional forms of anesthesia – spinal or epidural (neuraxial) anesthesia and peripheral nerve blocks (PNB) – which only numb the area of the body that requires surgery, provide better pain control and faster rehabilitation and fewer complications than general anesthesia, research shows. But some surgeons avoid using them due to concerns regional anesthesia may cause motor weakness, making patients more likely to fall when they are walking in the first days after knee replacement surgery.

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  • Select rheumatoid arthritis patients can safely undergo same-day double knee replacement

    Same-day bilateral knee replacement surgery is safe for select patients with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery in New York have found.

    Generally, patients with an inflammatory systemic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are sicker than patients with the degenerative condition osteoarthritis (OA), says senior study author Mark Figgie, M.D., chief of the Surgical Arthritis Service at Hospital for Special Surgery, and the hospital's first Allan E. Inglis, MD, Chair in Surgical Arthritis.

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  • The leading cause of failed prosthetic knee joints is infection

    The number of total knee replacement (TKR) procedures continues to climb, as does the number of revision total knee replacement (RTKR) surgeries.

    Elderly and female patients with a moderate number of comorbidities represented the largest proportion of the revision population. The authors suggest that optimizing patient health before surgery and paying meticulous attention to efforts by the surgical team to minimize the risk of periprosthetic joint infection may decrease the number of knee replacement revisions.

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  • Improving knee replacements with iASSIST system

    Each year, approximately 600,000 total knee replacement procedures are performed in the United States, a number that is expected to rise in the next decade as the population ages. For the first time in the United States, an iASSIST system is now in use. iASSIST is a computer navigation system with Bluetooth-like technology that improves surgical precision and accuracy in total knee replacements, decreasing the need for revision surgery.

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