Blog

  • Return-to-work rate high after knee replacement

    Getting back to work after knee-replacement surgery is a big concern for people contemplating the procedure. Now, a new study shows that most people return to work after a total knee replacement -- even those with physically demanding jobs.

    "We are now reaching a population that is younger and actively working. Most have very arthritic knees and expect to go back to work," Orozco said. Better implant materials that support more weight, improved surgical techniques that spare muscle, and better post-surgery patient care plans -- including pain management and physical therapy -- have increased the popularity of knee replacement in recent years, he said.

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  • Cartilage damage helps detect osteoarthritis?

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disorder and affects about one-third of older adults. New research suggests that cartilage damage from exercise may aid in early detection of osteoarthritis.

    "We discovered that GAG-depleted tissue is most vulnerable to high rates of loading and not just the magnitude of the load. This finding suggests that people with early degradation of cartilage, even before such changes would be felt as pain, should be careful of dynamic activities such as running or jumping," Grodzinsky was quoted as saying.

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  • A new approach to hip surgery

    Larry Kufel had always been an active man, tall and rangy, who worked out regularly and picked up basketball games at the gym. But age was taking a toll on his joints, and it had become clear that he needed a hip replacement.

    The procedure that Mr. Kufel received is called anterior hip replacement. The surgeon makes the incision at the front of the hip instead of through the buttocks or the side of the hip. This approach permits the doctor to reach the hip socket without cutting through major muscle groups. Proponents claim that the procedure results in less pain and fewer complications for patients than standard hip replacement.

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  • Hip surgery flip! Direct Anterior Hip Replacement

    The numbers are sky-rocketing. There were more than 300 thousand total hip replacements in 2010, that's up 135 thousand compared to just ten years earlier. As more and more people need help to relieve the pain, there's an option that's becoming popular with patients and surgeons.

    "It's a less invasive approach," Stefan Kreuzer, MD, associate professor at Memorial Hermann Hospital, told Ivanhoe. He went through the front of her leg to get to her hip, instead of the more traditional technique of going through the back.

    The doctor says the normal post-operative restrictions on hip movements do not apply to patients who undergo direct anterior hip replacement. He tells us it great for most people in need of a hip replacement, including highly active patients. The doctor is currently training surgeons from around the world on the technique.

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  • New technique revolutionizing hip-replacement surgery

    "It's a 'micro-invasive' technique," says Grandic.

    And it offers myriad advantages over other techniques.

    "All muscles, tendons, ligaments and soft tissue are spared, and the hip socket is never twisted into unnatural positions during surgery," Grandic explains.

    Thus, he says, patients experience little or no post-operative discomfort; are able to walk immediately, with no restrictions; and are usually discharged from the hospital within 24 to 48 hours.

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  • Quit smoking and enjoy that new hip

    Total hip replacement and smoking cigarettes just don't mix. That's because smoking can cramp the healing process. Even quitting just before surgery is better than not quitting at all.

    Researchers recently studied a group of patients who had undergone total hip replacement surgery. Patients who were current smokers had higher rates of infection, pain and loosened hip joints, which had to be corrected with a second surgery, compared to non-smokers.

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  • New surgery makes hip replacement easier

    The surgery is extensive. It involves removing the joint – the damaged bone and cartilage – and replacing it with prosthetic parts made of metal, plastic or ceramics. Typically, surgeons enter the joint from the rear, which requires cutting through muscle and cartilage. But a relatively new procedure enables surgeons to enter from the front and only stretch the muscles aside, avoiding the cutting and minimizing pain and recovery time. Those who use this anterior technique say the benefits are substantial.

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  • The fate of new hips in women

    Hip joint replacements can help patients regain normal mobility. But just like any surgery, risks are involved in hip replacement. And women may have a higher risk than men when it comes to failure of the new hip.

    Women were slightly more likely than men to have a failed hip replacement within three years of surgery, according to a new study.

    The findings highlighted the risks and precautions patients should consider before deciding to get a new hip.

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  • Toss the vitamin D and calcium?

    Preventing the risk of fractures as you grow older is important. Previously, vitamin D and calcium supplements were thought to help reduce that risk – but recommendations have changed.

    The Task Force actually recommends against vitamin D in daily doses of 400 IU or less and calcium in daily doses of 1000 mg or less because it can increase the risk of kidney stones. At those doses, supplements do not prevent fractures in younger men and women.

    However, the Task Force continues to recommend vitamin D supplements to prevent falls in adults 65 and older who are at higher risk for falls.

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  • More intense activity results in greater polyethylene wear for THA patients

    More intense activity, rather than amount of activity, has been linked with greater in-vivo polyethylene wear in highly crosslinked polyethylene implants, according to a results of a study from the Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting.

    “Based on this information, patients can be better instructed on what protects their joint form wear and what activities can be performed without affecting longevity,” Senden said. “Given our results, patients can protect the longevity of their implants without being less active.”

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