Science Daily

  • Cause of bone loss in joint implant patients uncovered in new study

    Researchers have discovered the long-sought reason that many people with joint replacements experience harmful inflammation and bone loss. Their finding may pave the way for new therapies to reduce pain and prevent the need for follow-up surgery.

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  • Looking to the future of bone replacements

    A new artificial bone design has been developed that can be customized and made with a 3-D printer for stronger, safer and more effective bone replacements, explains a new report.

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  • Better fix for torn ACLs

    A torn anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of the most common knee injuries. Approximately 200,000 Americans experience a torn ACL each year, and more than half undergo surgical repairs. Now, researchers have developed a model to show that a newer surgical technique results in a stronger, more natural ACL repair.

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  • Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopy in Competitive Athletes

    To evaluate the minimum 2-year postoperative clinical outcomes and the rate of return to sports in athletes who underwent capsular plication for the treatment of ligamentous laxity and/or borderline dysplasia during hip arthroscopy for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement and labral pathology.

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  • Yogurt consumption in older Irish adults linked with better bone health

    The largest observational study to date of dairy intakes and bone and frailty measurements in older adults has found that increased yogurt consumption was associated with a higher hip bone density and a significantly reduced risk of osteoporosis in older women and men on the island of Ireland, after taking into account traditional risk factors.

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  • Common hip issue in teens misdiagnosed as pulled muscle

    An athlete felt pain in his groin after a collision at the plate with an opposing player. He thought he had pulled a muscle, but it turns out he was suffering from a common condition seen in teens and young adults known as hip impingement.

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  • Activity could help keep knees lubricated

    Cartilage is filled with fluid -- about 80% of the volume of the cartilage tissue -- that plays the essential roles of supporting weight and lubricating joint surfaces. Loss of this fluid, called synovial fluid, results in a gradual decrease in cartilage thickness and increase in friction, which is related to the degradation and joint pain of osteoarthritis. Since cartilage is porous, fluid is readily squeezed out of the holes over time. Yet the symptoms associated with osteoarthritis usually take decades to develop. Researchers have now proposed a mechanism that explains how motion can cause cartilage to reabsorb liquid that leaks out.

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  • Subclinical hyperthyroidism associated with an increased risk of hip and other fractures

    In an analysis that included more than 70,000 participants from 13 studies, subclinical hyperthyroidism was associated with an increased risk for hip and other fractures including spine. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is a low serum thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration in a person without clinical symptoms and normal thyroid hormone concentrations on blood tests.

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  • Hip Fracture Patients: Nearly half have delirium, study suggests

    48 percent of hip fracture patients, age 65 and older, had delirium, or acute confusion, before, during and after surgery (perioperative), resulting in significantly longer hospital stays and higher costs for care, a new study concludes.

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  • Weight-loss surgery before joint replacement can improve outcomes in severely overweight patients

    Bariatric surgery prior to joint replacement is a cost-effective option to improve outcomes in severely overweight patients, research demonstrates. It is well-known that obesity takes a toll on one's health. Bariatric surgery and subsequent weight loss reduces the risk of heart disease, diabetes and even some forms of cancer. But before now, the effect of bariatric surgery on joint replacement outcomes was not known.

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