Minor exercise can protect premenopausal women's bones

Minor exercise can protect premenopausal women's bones

According to new research, premenopausal women who engage in physical activity can significantly reduce a known inhibitor of bone formation called sclerostin.

The study, which will be published in the October issue of Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM), also found that physical activity improved IGF-1 levels, which have a positive impact on bone formation.

"Physical activity training is conceptually simple, inexpensive, and can serve practical purposes including reducing the risk of low bone mass, osteoporosis, and consequently fractures. Our study found that even minor changes in physical activity were associated with clear effects on serum levels of sclerostin, IGF-1 and bone turnover markers."

 

According to new research, premenopausal women who engage in physical activity can significantly reduce a known inhibitor of bone formation called sclerostin.

The study, which will be published in the October issue of Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM), also found that physical activity improved IGF-1 levels, which have a positive impact on bone formation.

"Physical activity training is conceptually simple, inexpensive, and can serve practical purposes including reducing the risk of low bone mass, osteoporosis, and consequently fractures. Our study found that even minor changes in physical activity were associated with clear effects on serum levels of sclerostin, IGF-1 and bone turnover markers."

 

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