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  • Anterior vs. posterior: Does surgical approach impact hip replacement outcomes?

    The surgical approach to total hip replacement (THR)—either from the front of the body or the side/back (anterior versus posterior)— has no impact on outcomes six months after surgery, according to research presented today at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

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  • Reducing opioid use prior to joint replacement surgery linked to better outcomes

    The use of opioids (narcotic pain medication), often prescribed for chronic musculoskeletal pain, has skyrocketed in recent years with 98 percent of the world's opioid prescriptions filled in North America. Two research studies presented this week at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), link decreased opioid use prior to joint replacement surgery with improved patient satisfaction and outcomes, fewer complications, and a reduced need for post-surgical opioids.

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  • TXA safe and effective to reduce blood loss in joint replacement surgery, study finds

    Blood loss and the need for a blood transfusion are major concerns in joint replacement surgery, but a new use for an old drug is proving effective in reducing blood loss and transfusion rates, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). The drug, tranexamic acid, or TXA, has been used for decades in heart surgery, to treat hemophilia and to stop excessive uterine bleeding.

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  • After hip-replacement surgery, medication use decreases

    A new study, published November 15, in the journal Pain provides information on the trajectories of prescription drug use before and after hip-replacement surgery—total hip arthroplasty (THA), one of the most common types of joint replacement surgery. Hip- replacement surgery is commonly followed by long-term reductions in the use of prescription drugs for pain and insomnia.

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  • Study shows value of knee replacement surgery, other options

    People with knees worn out by arthritis will get more pain relief from joint replacement surgery, but it has more risks and there's a good chance that less drastic approaches also would help. That's the bottom line from the first study to strictly test other treatments against knee replacement, an operation done hundreds of thousands of times a year in the U.S.

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  • Researchers find clues that may predict recovery outcomes following total hip replacement

    Surgery to replace the arthritic hip and knee joints is on the rise in the U.S., with more than 1.1 million replacement surgeries reported in 2009. While these surgeries improve pain, mobility and quality of life for most recipients, some patients are dogged by persistent muscular problems. Now, a cross-institutional team of researchers has found that a patient's susceptibility to muscle inflammation may be a measurable marker that can be used to predict how well that patient will recover from joint replacement surgery and to identify those patients who may be in need of a specialized rehabilitation plan.

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  • Walking on an incline could help people suffering from knee problems

    Incline walking on a treadmill could benefit people with knee osteoarthritis or knee replacements, says a new study from Ball State University.

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  • Women fare better than men following total knee, hip replacement

    While women may have their first total joint replacement (TJR) at an older age, they are less likely to have complications related to their surgery or require revision surgery, according to a new study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). The findings contradict the theory that TJR is underutilized in female patients because they have worse outcomes then men.

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  • A hip and trunk training program for athletes reduces ACL injuries

    With the help of the Hockeyroos UWA researchers have developed a hip and trunk training program that could reduce the high rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in all levels of sport.

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  • Osteoarthritis patients will benefit from jumping exercise

    Progressive high-impact training improved the patellar cartilage quality of the postmenopausal women who may be at risk of osteoporosis (bone loss) as well as at risk of osteoarthritis. This was found out in the study carry out in the Department of Health Sciences at University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The effects of high-impact exercise were examined on knee cartilages, osteoarthritis symptoms and physical function in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. The study was conducted in cooperation with the Central Finland Central Hospital and the Department of Medical Technology, Institute of Biomedicine in University of Oulu in Finland.

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